Christy Aitken

Medium: Mixed Media

Christy was born in England and grew up in South America as well as various states in the US. She studied painting and printmaking at the Atlanta College of Art, now Savannah College of Art and Design. Christy is a mother of five and has been living in Columbia for 14 years.

Christy’s latest works are mixed media and range in material from beeswax to nails, screws to wire. She has been leaning toward a more minimalist aesthetic in recent years. Also a picture framer, it is not unusual for her inspiration to come from the frame itself when beginning a new piece, often recycling used frames.

Claiming the Mid-West as home, much of Christy’s art speaks of this hauntingly beautiful expanse of land, moody skies and the shapes.

Peter Driscoll

Medium: Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw is the art of engraving on Ivory. Peter continues to practice this art in the traditional manner of the whalers of 200 years ago – working completely by hand, using a sailmaker's sewing needle to engrave original designs on Antique Ivory Piano Keys, Mastodon and Woolly Mammoth Ivory.

Columbia, SC is where Peter calls home. He has created (and sold) more than 2,000 pieces of original scrimshaw. This includes over 100 juried and open regional and national fine art and craft shows, as well as hundreds of privately & corporate commissioned works.

Through his art he hopes to preserve the nearly lost art of Scrimshaw. By creating only original pieces, as well as teaching others through workshops, lectures, and hands-on demonstrations, Peter passes the knowledge of scrimshaw on to others. He also works in other mediums such as sculpture, photography, and drawing with graphite and pen & ink. Pete says, "I believe this helps to extend my choice of subject matter, and expand my creative boundaries."

Brian Francis

Brian Francis

Medium: Fine Art-Varied

Brian Francis has been creating art in the greater Columbia area since 2001 after moving here from Indianapolis, Indiana. The diversity of both his subject matter and the mediums he chooses to work with are a reflection of his development as an artist across several decades and states. Obtaining degrees in Commercial Art and Graphic Design from Vincennes University, as well as in Landscape Architecture from Purdue University, Brian's education is a direct reflection of the various creative forces at work in his art.

Focusing largely on an appreciation for both the human form and its natural surroundings, his art finds much of its expression through use of texture incorporated both through the images themselves as well as the material they are reflected on.

Amanda Goforth

Amanda Goforth

Medium: Pastel Pencil/Colored Pencil

Amanda Goforth is an award-winning pastel artist specializing in soft pastel pet and animal portraiture. She currently lives in Columbia, SC and is a proud pet parent to a dog, seven cats and a mostly retired Tennessee Walking Horse.

While maintaining a successful career in the graphic arts industry, she has continued to expand on her traditional art skills as well. She is an accomplished painter in oils, acrylics and alkyds, and equally capable with pencil and paper.

Her favorite is pastel pencil on velour paper; this is her medium of choice for pet portraits. She welcomes all who would grace her drawing board, from the tiniest hamster to the mightiest steed.

Patrick Hawkins

Patrick Hawkins

Medium: Printmaking/Etching

Patrick Hawkins, a native of Virginia, moved to South Carolina in 2008. Since his arrival, he has become an active member in Columbia's arts community as a classical musician and public school educator.

Patrick first became interested in printmaking while teaching overseas in South Korea during the mid-1990s. Asian woodblock prints, rice paper, and subtle use of color were original points of inspiration. Years later, after having been introduced to etching by Ruth Leaf (Venice Beach, California) and Joan Thompson (Phoenix, Arizona), Patrick became inspired to print monotypes. Using techniques used by such artists as Joseph Solman, Milton Avery, and Karl Knaths; Patrick often paints directly onto glass and then transfers the image by hand onto paper or he paints onto plexiglass and transfers his image onto paper using an antique etching press.

Jeffery Schwalk

Jeffery Schwalk

Medium: Oil/Various

Jeffery is a Texas native transplanted to Columbia,  South Carolina, just over three years ago. He began creating art at the age of four, and is a trained artist who enjoys working in most mediums. 

His paintings are in private collections around the world and he has been recognized for his work with various awards in the South-Central United States. Jeffery is one of the partners of Artizan.

Darlett Stone

Rita Smith

Medium: Oil Paint

Rita is an internationally known self taught realistic artist whose sensitive, romantic watercolors, acrylics and oils hang in private and corporate collections across the nation and abroad.

A native of New Jersey and long time resident of Columbia, SC, she fell in love with the low country, spending summers in Hilton Head, Pawleys, Keowa and Edisto Islands and storing memories of the countryside and beaches, sunrises, sunsets and misty marshes. In the winter, she becomes nostalgic and paints snow scenes which she misses from years spent in the mountains of New Jersey.

Rita started drawing and painting at the age of seven and never stopped. She married early and painted for her own pleasure while raising two daughters and in 1970 began painting professionally. She became very active in the city artist guilds and in 1990, she opened her own art gallery at the Richland Mall and for a short time had a gallery in Charleston as well. She has exhibited in many one, two and three artist shows and her award winning paintings have been on magazine covers. Ducks Unlimited in Myrtle Beach has auctioned her duck prints many times. She was voted “Artist of the Year” by the Boys Club of America in 1995, and has received many “First Place” and “Best of Show” awards.

She works primarily in acrylics and oils, always striving to improve her work – trying to capture the quiet and peace of snow in winter, the elusive ground fog in the marsh in the mornings, the beauty of nature’s paintbrush in the fall, the breeze in the sea oats on the beach and the peacefulness of the salt marshes with the ever present Palmetto trees. Her subject matter is endless and her enthusiasm to capture it never ends.
Darlett Stone

Darlett Stone

Medium: Water Color

Darlett became a full time watercolor artist after raising her family and a successful business career.  A native South Carolinian born in Columbia she now resides in Charleston.

Although largely self taught, Darlett has studied under many nationally recognized artists including Linda Stevens-Moyer, Virginia Fouche Bolton, George "Griff" Griffith, Anne Hightower Patterson, and Debbie Sherer. Darlett began painting in the Columbia, South Carolina area where her talent was immediately noticed. She won awards in several juried art shows including the South Carolina State Fair, Anderson County Arts Center, Chapin Art League, and Trenholm Artist Guild. Her most recent works have been commissioned for private collections throughout the United States.

Darlett's work reflects her natural ability to present organic scenery using bold and vivid colors with a unique perspective. Her unique style and use of color separates her work from traditional watercolors. She especially enjoys capturing the play of light and shadows found among the local flora and fauna throughout the Low Country of South Carolina.

Steve Teets

Steve Teets

Medium: Colored Pencil

A fifty two year old artist from Lake Murray, South Carolina, Steve Teets has been working in Color Pencil, Pastels, Charcoals, Pen & Ink and Acrylics for over 35 years. Steve is an award winning artist, his most recent being a Color Pencil on Pastel Board titled “Tastings” that won 1st place in the 2010 Seven Oaks Art League Competition. Also, in 2010, his Color pencil pointillism piece “Before They’re Wine” won the Dr. John J. O’Neal Fine Art Merit Award at the South Carolina State Fair.

Though Steve works in many mediums, he has concentrated over the past several years on Color Pencil which for Steve, gives him the control that best suits his creative style. Most recently, Steve has taken a new approach that he is extremely passionate about. His self-described “Mosaic Pointillism” is somewhat Impressionistic, which takes the concept of Pointillism and infuses it with a Mosaic tile pattern which results in a vibrant and colorful interpretation of a subject.

Steve is originally from the Washington D.C./Baltimore MD area where his passion for art and career as an artist originated. Steve enjoys portraying both human and pet; naturalistic scenes of wildlife and their habitat; as well as classical urban settings. He moved to South Carolina in 2004 where he lives with his wife Cindy, Jack Russell Warner and cats, Waylon and Willie.

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Al Dorsa

Al Dorsa

Medium: Photography

Al Dorsa, a 30-year resident of St. Croix, Virgin Islands has never strayed far from the arts. A lifetime photographer and designer, he's been involved in projects ranging from publishing a magazine to patenting an invention to recently hanging a camera from a kite to make aerial photographs.

Currently, Al is using a technique called High Dynamic Range (HDR) photography which blends multiple exposures of the same scene, recovering detail normally lost in shadows or highlights. Usually three or more exposures are combined using special software to create the effects you see in his images.

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David Ayers John Banks

David Ayers & John Banks
2 Guys N Dirt

Medium: Pottery

David and John are the “Two Guys” of 2 Guys N Dirt Studios and are Artists in Residence at The Art Sanctuary of Indiana.

David Ayers was born 1956 in Indiana and raised in Morgan County, attending Martinsville High School, Northwood University, and University of the Americas, Bogota, Columbia, S.A.  David spent the majority of his life in the Jewelry Industry before returning to Morgan County.

John Banks was born 1955 in Alpena, Michigan.  John worked for Dow Chemical for 35 years.  Upon retirement from Dow he was the Robotics expert for the Natural Products Group.

David’s first experience with pottery was instruction from M. Zaidi of Hamadan, Iran, while John’s first experience with pottery was at the studio of Monrovia Mudworks where both took instruction from Jolee Chartrand.

While avoiding three dimensional images of animals, the body of David’s work does exhibit many three dimensional organic designs with rustic, old world and eastern shapes. His work is done in several different types of clay and porcelain with a wide range in sizes from two to three inches to a few feet tall.  Both David and John enjoy using their backgrounds in chemical knowledge to push the envelope creating glazes and glaze combination reactions.

Johns’ specialty is hand building organic feeling pieces that look as if they may have been picked up from nature; also excelling in creating Horsehair Raku in the ancient Japanese style.  John also makes a variety of functional pottery pieces which include platters, vases, and bowls for everyday use.   John also enjoys forming Sculpture pieces.

John and David moved to northern Morgan County in 2006 they both enjoy dividing their time between gardening, raising Koi and the art world.

Marianela Borsten

Marianela Borsten
Nela Ceramics

Medium: Functional Pottery

In the field of Ceramic Artistry Marianela Borsten has been an unassuming, yet powerful voice for her craft. Using deliberate but delicate lines and evocative images, Nela gently draws the viewer into her realm of understanding and meaning and makes a statement about the forces of nature at work in art.

Marianela prepared for her career in her home country of Venezuela with the discipline of working in the family graphic arts and advertising business. This experience not only provided a strong foundation in visual communications, but it challenged her to seek a balance between the artistic and functional ideals that would eventually surface in her work as a full time clay artist.

Having committed herself to ceramics in 1990, her growing success as a potter and skill at the wheel encouraged Marianela to found her own pottery studio, MariArte. Two years later it was the MariArte Studio that brought to Marianela her first significant honors and saw her placing permanent exhibitions in prestigious galleries in Caracas, and later in the gift shop exhibition space of the Contemporary Arts Museum also in Caracas. The MariArte Studio also realized certain financial stability with the support of patrons who commissioned several custom gift works for members of the executive and administrative staff at the military hospital in Venezuela.

Following seven successful years at the MariArte Studio, Marianela relocated to Florida in 1997 where she worked as a wheel throwing instructor while exhibiting her work at Miami Art Works for almost 3 years.

Margarete Handy

Margarete Handy

Medium: Clay, Mixed Medium

Raised in Dallas, Texas, by her grandparents, Margarete grew up being told she was "going to be an artist." Her creative endeavors began in theatre at the age of six, but later being a mother of four children consumed much of her time. As her children grew, she became more independent, initially serving on th Board of the Artist's Alliance of San Antonio. One day, she "found clay." Or perhaps it found her. The bond was instant and provided Margarete creative expression amidst her busy life.

Eventually, Margarete found the perfect environment for her clay creations to find a captive audience when she discovered Rennaissance Faires, even coordinating such events.

Adopting her subject matter because it felt "right...and was fun," her art is influenced by themes of fantasy and daily inspirations, "each day lovely art appears; primative cave art, tribal art, magick, and symbols." She hopes her pieces are seen by viewers "just that it says something good to them."

Although Handy knows she will always find a way to express her creativity, she makes no big plans. "Always go with the flow; if I make hard plans, the Gods giggle."

Pat Holt

Pat Holt

Medium: Low Fire Clay

"Thirteen years ago my business partner Sara Soma and I decided to work together to create contemporary, beautifully painted ornaments, pins and magnets." Pat does all the production work, which consists of using low fire clay to create the designs, drying them, sanding edges and surfaces to make them smooth to the touch, then kiln firing them. Since pieces can be stacked, and since the kiln has several shelves, it takes some time to prepare a firing.

When the kiln cools, all the items are removed and sent to her partner, Sara, who chooses the incredible color combinations, then paints them with acrylics, wires and beads them using commercial quality findings. Each piece is signed on the back.

Because each piece is meticulously made by hand, the pair doesn't turn out thousands required by big box stores. Instead, their niche is the fine craft gallery whose customers appreciate work made by hand. Pat only works with a single gallery in any city, so it’s important to have a good fit.

Kathleen LeSueur

Kathleen LeSueur
LeSueur Clay Work

Medium: Functional Pottery

Kathleen began her training as a painter. But with her introduction to clay, she discovered the excitement of forming her canvas, and the satisfaction of adding utility as an integral dimension of her art.

By selecting reduction firing, Kathleen enjoys the endless variations of natural elements reacting with each other in the firing chamber, while her glaze application technique retains the freedom of watercolor. The classic thrown forms and crisp slab constructed pieces in high-fired stoneware speak to a sense of order and durability.

From the mantel to the microwave, from the dining table to the dishwasher, LeSueur clay work is designed to be used as well as admired.

Kathie Wolk

Kathie Wolk

Medium: Pottery

Kathie Wolk lives in Little River, South Carolina. She originally began making jewelry in 1990, creating jewelry from plastic, beads, and Paper Mache. She expanded to making pottery in order to add to her jewelry line with ceramic jewelry. She then found pottery to be a perfect creative outlet- making unique dishes as well as pendants from clay. All of her work is one of a kind- whether it's jewelry, pottery or painting.

Kathie’s jewelry and pottery are sold throughout the country through her website. She has also been working as arts and crafts and painting instructor on international cruise ships, where she shares her love of creativity with others.

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Bryan S. Burgin

Jack and Rose Boette

Medium: Upcycled Glass

Both South Carolina natives, the couple began looking for a hobby that they could enjoy together. This came with two goals: 1) to meet new and interesting people; and, 2) to achieve their desire to be more sustainable.

After a few years of looking, the Boettes settled on upcycled glass. The original idea from seeing slumped bottles made into trays and bowls; further exploration of similar items turned up various types of upcycled glass products. After trying a few items, we settled on the “cold worked” drinking glasses, dishes and jewelry. (As opposed to “hot worked” which refers to kiln-fired pieces.) We’ve been making items for four years.

Bryan S. Burgin

Bryan S. Burgin

Medium: Slumped Glass
Bryan Burgin has had a life long fascination with colored glass and the play of light. In 2007, he enrolled in a Fused Glass class and began traveling to Charleston to hone his technique. Now operating from a home studio, Bryan has begun devoting more time to his art when his position as Director of Conferences, PR and Marketing at USC allows. In this position, he serves on a number of state and national boards for which he has received numerous awards. Bryan is proud to have also spent many years of service to the AIDS Benefit Foundation of South Carolina as a Board Member, Dining With Friends Co-Chair and Board President. Most recently, Bryan won the People's Choice award from the Columbia Museum of Art for his piece, Fused Glass.
Lynnae Lyons

Lynnae Lyons

Medium: Glass Mosaic

Lynnae Lyons is a South Carolina based mosaic artist who specializes in glass on glass and up-cycled mosaics. Lynnae was a Navy brat, raised mostly in the Phillipines and Japan. While growing up she had an opportunity to try her hand at many artforms: from block printing, stained glass, carving, black and white photography, scrapbooking, wreath making, cake making, and more.

It was in Japan that Lynnae became fascinated with nature, textures, and the effects that light has on a composition. Eventually Lynnae married a Naval Officer and lived in Italy (where they had a baby boy) and Brittain and travelled as much as she could while living in both places. While in Italy she was introduced to mosaics as an artform versus just a craft. After her husband's retirement, the family moved to Columbia where earned a BA in Special Education at Columbia College.

Her love of puzzles, black and white photography, and repurposing lead her to the mosaic artform. She sees mosaics as a puzzle; using light, types of tessarae, and color to express depth and texture in her pieces. You will usually find an unexpected element in her pieces; anything from beads, stones, and cats. Her recent awards include 1st place at the South Carolina State Fair plus the Sweepstakes ribbon for a up-cycled bowling ball turned into a stained glass mosaic peacock gazing ball.

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Mary Brock

Mary Brock

Medium: Wire Jewelry
First and foremost, Mary is a wife to her wonderful husband of almost one year and mother of two boys, ages five and one. Other members of their family include various fish, invertebrates, and corals, all of whom live in one of two saltwater aquariums.

Mary is also a Registered Nurse with nine years' experience ranging from Labor and Delivery to Hospice, and has worked both in home health and hospital settings. As well as being a homemaker, she enjoys creating quality items by hand for those with a taste for fashion and for the environmentally conscious.

Mary's goal is to share her passion through lovingly putting her craft into the hands of others. Drawing inspiration from the old rather than the new, she has a love for the history of things. She "loves taking an old idea and giving it new life in modern application."

Cindy Bumstead

Cindy Bumstead

Medium: Jewelry
Cindy L. Bumstead, has lived in Columbia SC, for the past 32 years. "My passion has always been creating unique jewelry off and on for the past 20 years." I try to find unusual Items and material to create my jewelry. A prolific designer, Cindy draws inspiration from beauty in nature. Her pieces are organic and unusual, and all are original.

 

Betty Evans

Betty Evans

Medium: Lampworked Glass Jewelry

Beautiful glass, refined in Southern heat

Betty Evans' lampwork bead jewelry blends a sense of playfulness with talented craftsmanship.  She has been "playing with fire" for over twelve years and has created a unique appealing style.  She incorporates her finished beads into award-winning jewelry designs that often look like they just might be alive.

She is continuously improving her craft, travelling to attend workshops and exchanging notes with local lampworker friends.  Her work can be found at Artizan in Columbia and  Beadlush in Charlotte.  She also participates in Open Studios, the Columbia Green garden tour and the SC State Fair.  

When she is not at her torch, Betty enjoys painting watercolors, pine needle basket weaving, photography, fabric art, creating with found objects, church activities, sailing, learning about nifty science and nature, cleaning the green goo out of her fishpond filter and running a ServiceMaster franchise with her husband.

A graduate of the University of South Carolina, Betty has two adult children and lives in Columbia with her husband, three geriatric cats and about a dozen surprisingly large koi.  

Sandy Hennies

Sandy Hennies

Medium: Jewelry

Born and bred in Columbia- a southerner through and through- Sandy is what another southerner would call “a colorful character.”  She has always had a creative touch in everything from home decorating to scrapbooking.  Only recently has she decided to share her jewelry making hobby with others.  Her handcrafted jewelry is one- of- a -kind wearable art.  Each piece will suit tastes from conventional to eclectic.

As a professional therapist, Sandy understands and appreciates the unique nature of the individual human psyche.  Like her clients, each of her creations is unique and has a story to tell
Avery Homes

Avery Homer

Medium: Chainmaille
Avery hails from Austin, Texas, where he continues to create amazing jewelry designs in solid sterling. A lover of life, his pieces embody the belief that the body should be adorned with substantial and meaningful ornaments.

 

Jean Norman

Jean Norman

Medium: Jewelry

Jean Norman has always enjoyed wearing well-crafted jewelry: earrings, bracelets, necklaces.  As long as the pieces were identifiable by an artisan, used mixtures of stones and metals, and were affordable Jean acquired distinctive items to compliment her mood and wardrobe. 

After retiring from the University of South Carolina faculty and moving to the lowcountry, she discovered an avenue of creativity: making jewelry for herself and her friends. In 2010 an informal committee of friends who recognized the quality of her craft encouraged Jean to expand her horizons and share her jewelry ideas beyond her friends. 

She established Stone by Stone Treasures and now four galleries, including Artizan, Columbia SC, offer her unique one of a kind designs using nature's own to create wearable, affordable treasures. 

Craig Robson

Craig Robson

Medium: Fine Jewelry

Craig hails from Florida and has lived in Lexington, SC, for the past 16 years. He began designing and creating jewelry at the age of 19 while attending college.

Among his many achievements, Craig is a certified scuba instructor, as well as an avid traveler. He draws inspiration for his work from many organic and natural settings.

(Web Editor's note: Craig is an affable guy who refused to allow anything more in the way of a photo than a snapshot using Christa's iPhone!)

Kathryn Seward

Kathryn Seward

Medium: Wire Wrap Jewelry

Katie Seward is driven by the desire to create interesting things, and sees something new at every turn. Currently, Kathryn has a selection of earrings available at Artizan, each pair unique and thoughtful in design.

 Whether she is painting, sewing, or practicing botany, she finds deep satisfaction when admiring her finished works. Her need to create objects of interest leads her down a constant path of innovation and experimentation.

 A former chemist and a current medical student at the University of South Carolina, Katie blends a love of science with a passion for art. The jewelry that she creates reflects both her unique perspective as well as her improvisational techniques.

Andrew Stinson

Andrew Stinson

Medium: Urban Steampunk Jewelry

Andrew Stinson is a North Carolina native who relocated to Columbia in 2005 via Myrtle Beach, where he worked as a Floral Designer. That year, he won the South Carolina Floral Designer of the Year award and worked with The Blossom Shop.

Andrew has always been creative and crafty, with a particular eye for all aspects of design. Whether flowers, fabric, paper, or found objects, he has a penchant for thinking outside of the box. He loves to be different and a true original.

Serving on several philanthropic boards in South Carolina, Andrew stays busy with designing and planning many events including The Pink Party, The Free Times BEST OF Party, The 701 CCA Halloween Bash and The AIDS Benefit Foundation's Dining With Friends Dessert Finale.

Andrew's personal love of ALL THINGS artistic (music, dance, theatre, art, etc.) is prevalent in everything he touches and draws inspiration from the most unusual of places.

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Jaidra Durant

Jaidra Durant

Medium: Silk Art
A self taught artist specializing in silk painting, henna art, and sculptural jewelry, Jaidra is based in Greenville, South Carolina. Jaidra first started working with silk in 2006 when she dyed dance veils for herself and her students. She immediately fell in love with silk painting and started experimenting with a variety of dyeing techniques, fabrics, and color combinations. As a dancer and ecologist, Jaidra uses both silk painting and jewelry design to express her love of movement and nature.

Jaidra works primarily in serti technique and brush painting using jacquard green label silk dyes. Her pieces are individually painted and steam set for vibrancy and permanency in color. When she isn't working on her art, Jaidra enjoys teaching and performing Folkloric Fusion Bellydance and fire dance, writing, and spending time with friends and family.

Joelle Medici

Joelle Medici

Medium: Fabric Art

Joelle Medici was born in Denver, Colorado and now resides in Ann Arbor, Michigan with her husband and fat cats. Before she could even write her own name, her grandmother was teaching her to embroider, cross-stitch, and most importantly, how to make plush creatures.

During her time at the University of Memphis she earned her bachelors degree in Fine Arts and Design. With her love of sewing and background in design, Joelle soon began making stuffed creatures for children's birthday gifts. Soon after graduating in 2008, she created her own line of Mr. Sogs Creatures, which has now become her full time career.

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Ethel Barr

Ethel Barr

Medium: Baskets
Ethel Barr has deep southern roots and has been here in Columbia for over 30 years. She first learned sweet grass weaving from Susan Wingard. Her intricate patterns reflect a plethora of traditional stitches. Her baskets have a tight precision to them as they reveal their natural colors from traditional materials. Ethel Barr is also a beloved teacher and has taught many a person the art of sweet grass and long needle pine weaving.
Penelope Carter

Penelope Carter

Medium: Baskets

Penelope, a Brooklyn, New York native, has resided in Wedgefield, South Carolina for over 30 years. She lives with her husband, Roger, and her dog, Toto.

Penelope attended classes in sweet grass and pine needle basket weaving at the Sumter Art Gallery.

Hip surgery laid her low for a while, so her husband suggested using her basket weaving talents to cheer her up. She became prolific at basket weaving and created her own uniqute sylte: utilitarian works of art.

The pine needles used for the baskets are gathered locally in Sumter and Lexington counties. The baskets are crafted using green and brown pine needles, raffia and waxed linen thread. Some are created by staining and wood burning a bottom wood. The all-pine-needle baskets are started using a technique called "rosettes."

Each basket is a labor of love and takes from 10 to 25 hours of meticulous dexterity. Her baskets won first, second and third place at the 2013 Sumter County Fair.

The name Penelope means "the weaver."
Sylvia Fleming

Sylvia Fleming

Medium: Baskets
Sylvia Fleming began basket weaving about 7 years ago under the tutelage of Susan Wingard. Her deep South Carolina roots reveal themselves in her colorful baskets and trays that are wound with bright color wrappings. Each design is a unique piece of art. She uses local long needle pine straw and sweet grass. Some of her creations are made with hand dyed pine needles for a rich earthy look.
Charles & Maxine Weber

Charles & Maxine Weber

Medium: Baskets

Fourteen years ago we became interested in the creation of coiled pine needle baskets and vases. All materials are gathered by hand (i.e. pine needles, black walnuts, acorns, and leaves). As our talents grew, we were able to add more intricate designs. The difficulty levels of our selections were minimal in the beginning. Over time, with many hours of practice, we were able to create a larger variety with more designs and improved quality.

The couple won 1st place in the Contemporary and Traditional Crafts category at the 2008 46th Annual Amish Acres Arts & Crafts Festival with their unique Pine Needle and Deer Antler Basket. 

All creations are double stitched, which creates the designs that enhance the appeal of the final product. Several stitches are used with swirl and straight being the most common. The weaving of baskets and vases is tightly and intricately done using nylon thread.

Maxine is the artisan who creates and decorates the pine needle vases. Each vase begins with a special design called "Tenerife". "Tenerife" is a design woven with raffia inside a copper ring. This forms the base for the piece. Pine needles are woven using a continuous coil to form and shape the vase. Depending on the size of the finished product, 12 to 120 hours are required. Decorations of various beads, feathers, and suede are added to complement the finished product.

Charles designs and creates the baskets. Baskets are started by using a walnut or decorative board for the center. Pine needles are woven using nylon thread to form the shape. Slices of black walnuts are added throughout the pine needle basket to create different shapes and sizes. Baskets can contain between one and sixteen walnut slices, thus increasing the difficulty and beauty. Depending on the size and number of walnut slices used, 8 to 60 hours are required for completion. A wildlife series of pine needle baskets has been added to our collection featuring a variety of animals on scroll sawn centers. We also have a wood burnt pine needle basket collection which features wood burnt images of animals or other objects such as trains, angels and more.

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Chris Keitt

Chris Keitt

Medium: Bath & Body Botanicals

I started thinking about making skin care products years ago after working for a mass retailer of beauty products. I realized that today's skin care is not what it used to be. So many chemicals, so many artificial dyes, so many synthetic fragrances.

I finally decided in the early part of 2013 that I would create a line of skin care products that are all natural and good for the body and the soul. Having sensitive skin my entire life, I understand what it is like to not have many options when it comes to over-the-counter products. I wanted to create a line of products that would do more good than harm. Thus, Natural Beauty was born.

On a personal note, I was born and raised right here in South Carolina. I grew up in Lexington but moved to Gaston about ten years ago. I live with my partner of four years and enjoy the simple life that comes with living in the country

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Matt Borders

Matt Borders

Medium: Wood

Matt Borders is an Indiana native and life-long woodworker. Carving, turning, and period furniture reproduction are his forte, though he can turn his hand to anything that once had bark or a trunk. He specializes in using the natural character of the wood to direct its purpose, keeping with clean designs and finishes that produce a clarity and transparency, and revealing the inner virtue of the wood.

A devoted father, humorist, and wordsmith, Matt's natural abilities make him a sought after teacher who reveals that all the world needs is some sharp hand-tools, a keen eye, and a sense of humor (which he often loses when dealing with computers). Matt lives and practices his craft on the outskirts of Bloomington, Indiana, with his two sons Lane and Wyatt, their dog Tyronne, and WAY too many cats.

Tim Boger

Tim Boger

Medium: Wood

Tim Boger was born in California in 1957. His stay there was brief as his family moved to Honolulu, Hawaii where he spent the next 40 years growing up and then raising a family of his own.

Inspired by his father’s creative talents, Tim found his calling in the ceramic tile and marble industry, which provided him a successful career for many years. Although a wonderful artistic outlet, it was a career that takes a toll on the knees and back. Looking for an "upright occupation," he returned to his birthplace in 1998, and later relocated to Lexington, South Carolina in 2006.

Tim’s refined eye for blending color and pattern layout flourished with his newfound passion in the medium of wood, specifically in the discipline of Segmented Turning. As a self-taught wood turner of 14 years, the challenges were many.

Now, with his fundamental skills developed, Tim combines form design, natural wood color, and patterns into an endless collection of inspired creations. He finds the process enjoyable - starting with the design of form, material selection, cutting and gluing – through to the carefully applied finish. As he puts it, "There’s nothing as satisfying as finally holding a beautifully finished piece for others to enjoy."

Philip Maas

Philip Maas

Lexington, SC

Medium: Woodturning

Phil Maas is a native of Wisconsin and has been an active woodworker since 1988. He now calls Lexington, South Carolina his home and after retiring in 2001, he decided to devote more time to his craft - his newly chosen hobby of woodworking. This "hobby" has manifested itself in to a more-than-idle recreation.

His interests have expanded from necessary projects around the house, to crafting items of both decorative and functional design. He prefers working with contrasting wood tones as well as exotic species.

ARTIST NAME

Brian McLane, Sr.

Columbia, SC

Medium: Woodturning

Woodturning is the art of taking a block of wood 1.5x1.5x2 and hand turning it on a wood lathe to make different designs for the top of the stopper. The woods he uses come from all over the world. For example, the Bethelehem Olive wood (over 300 years old), bloodwood, eucalyptus gum, spalted tamarind, zirecote, and many other woods.

The Stainless Steel stoppers (made in the USA) themselves have a lifetime guarantee are FDA approved as well as winery approved. They are used in wine bottles,vinegar cruets,bath oil bottles.

Columbia is where Brian has called home for the last 43 years,started making the stoppers back in 2012 .

Jerry Moon

Jerry Moon

Medium: Woodworking

Jerry grew up in the Central Valley of California in the 60s and 70s. After his enlistment in the Navy, he moved to Washington State in the late 80s and earned a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Portland. He now calls Washougal, Washington home, where he is a musician, woodworker, engineer, and husband.

Inspired by his father, and grandfather, he began woodworking at the ripe old age of five or six. His work developed from building forts and tree houses in the back yard with his father's lumber, to building kitchen cabinets, furniture, and annual Christmas gifts for family and friends. Over the last few years he has become hopelessly addicted to woodturning, and likes to embellish his work with pyrography. Some of his original artwork includes wooden vases, bowls, cups, custom beer tap handles, wine bottle stoppers, and much more, mainly from locally harvested trees.

Mike Reynolds

Michael L. Reynolds

Medium: Wood/Games

Born in June of 1970, Mike hails from a small town called Lexington, South Carolina.  He works full-time as a customer service technician for Windstream Corporation.  He has been married for sixteen years to his wife, Cindy, and they have two precious sons named Dalton and Nathan. He first started general woodworking in the early years of his and Cindy's marriage at the suggestion of her father, an experience woodworker himself. 

Mike began making exquisite marble games in 2006, and goes to great lengths to select the most beautiful hard woods, and assemble them in the most attractive designs.  Some of the woods used are from Cindy's grandfather's cedar collection, and from a tree cut down years ago from her great-grandfather's yard.

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Barbara Bryan

Barbara Bryan

Medium: Handmade Books

A crafty one right from the start, Barbara learned the gentle art of needle work appropriate to her Southern heritage.

Later, she broke the gender craft rules by making furniture and, later, commercial stained glass. Now, however, she is back to gentler crafts: fibre arts including spinning, dyeing, felting, etc., and wonderful handmade books which are featured at Artizan.
She has had many brilliant and generous teachers, and the John. C. Campbell Folk School has inspired her to no end.

Barbara extends her thanks for perusing her books and support CRAFTS!

Wendy Drolma

Wendy Drolma

Medium: Masks

The most prevalent question I am asked as I present my work is why did I choose to create masks? As I thought about this, I knew that a series of seemingly disconnected circumstances could not adequately express that which awakens one to creative expression. More significantly, I feel the answer is in my interpretation of those experiences.

I have vague memories of an African mask I saw as a child. I used a picture of it as part of an art project back in grade school. I was captivated by its mystery. Long and narrow, it was made of wood. Many years passed before I can remember seeing masks again. It was more than ten years later in New York City that I wandered into a store offering clay masks and was completely fascinated. I felt each mask had a secret life, a life no one knew about except its owner. What lay behind those eyes, I wondered. Perhaps these same curiosities are what impelled me years later.

There are no mistakes. The events that move us are masters at bringing us to meet our destiny. Nothing fell short off that perfection on my journey into mask-making. It was late 1989 when I became aware of my desire to create them. I was led to all the right people and places, and then finally into a belief in myself. These masks come from my heart. Some I've seen in dreams. All arrive in mysterious ways. They are my friends, I can feel it. When you wear one you'll sense its desire to take over. It's safe to let go. These masks hold no secrets from their masters. You need only to trust them and then to trust yourself.

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